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#1 TroutBum76

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 08:12 PM

I'm looking to get into spey casting/fishing and was thinking of starting out with a switch rod so that I could use it on local rivers that may be smaller than the Salmon river. I was wondering if it utilizes the same gear as my single handed rod? Could I use the same lines and reels? What is a good "cheap" rod? Does anyone have a switch rod that they are willing to part with or sell?

Thanks in advance!

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#2 NYfly

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 07:27 AM

I'm thinking about making the "switch" as well, but before I go buying stuff I'm going out with an old pro for some casting instruction. Wayne at Troutfitter in Syracuse has a loaner switch rod that he is kind of enough to let others try, and a buddy of his that is very good with a switch is going to help teach me proper technique.

I did buy my Orvis Mirage V reel with the expectation that I would be using it on my one handed rod, as well as with a switch in the future. It has a lot of line capacity, depending on how much I enjoy the switch rod I may invest in an extra spool in the future. But again, I want to get a good feel for it before I go nuts buying stuff.
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#3 reelinsteel

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 07:33 AM

St. Croix makes a switch rod for around $200.00 , and Wildwater Fly Fishing makes Switch rods under $200.00 with a Lifetime Warranty. As NYfly stated, you will need a reel that will hold a lot of line. Malinda's Fly shop in Altmar specializes in Two-handed rods, and can answer all your questions and get you started on the right foot. The world of Spey/Switch can be very confusing. See Malinda.
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#4 jackstraw11

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 07:48 AM

I use the Orvis Helios switch and the Temple Fork Outfitters Deek Creek. The latter is more budget friendly.

The only upgrade gear wise you will need is longer leaders, longer sink tips, and if you want ease of casting, a specialty line (which would most likely require a size up reel to allow for the additional diameter line). I am a big fan of the RIO Skagit short and RIO Outbound line. Both specialy lines allow me to roll cast with ease. The Outbound can be over hand cast and shot out with ease.

I also really like the ros made by Allen. I have only cast them in parking lots and casting ponds, not actually fishing them. I hear they might have a labor day sale going on ;)

#5 Fish-N-Chip

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 08:17 AM

You don't need to buy a new rod to learn how to spey cast. You can do all the casts with your single hand rod and a weight forward or double taper line. A regular leader and some polyleaders (10ft -12ft sink tip) is all you'll need.

A switch rod can actually be tougher to learn with in the long run. A 12'-13' spey rod is a great place to start and Echo makes some great rods at resonable prices.

I

#6 King Davy

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 08:36 AM

Fish N Chip makes a great point here. Somehow we lost track of the fact that swinging flies/streamers isn't just for two handed applications. Case in point my very capable fly fishing wife learned to make two handed style casts years before owning her first switch and spey rod. So when she moved to those longer rods she could the very same day fish them adequately.

I love switch rods because it gives me options. From more single hand presenattions like nymphing, and indi fishing, to adding a looped in shooting head and having the ability to connect sinking tips should I want to swing bigger flies deeper in the water column, and possibly at greater distances.

In most of our rivers on the South Shore of LO, a rod under 12 feet will get the job done and especially on the Salmon River. Not to say you can't enjoy fishing a legit two handed rod in smaller rivers. But a 10.5 to 12 foot rod will handle the casting options you might want to use in a days outing.

Reels.....50 yards of backing...a shooting line (usually 60 to 100 foot) , and then a couple shooting heads is all you need. A lighter head in the 30 to 35 foot range you can loop to the shooting line...to nymph or indi fish with...and then a stouter mass head (compact skagit, or Scandi) In the 20 to 30 foot range for fishing heavier flies and tips. A large Arbor reel isn't necessary....I have many single hand reels that will handle this line load.

If you are in the Salmon River area...I seriously suggest visiting Melinda's shop...she will work with you and your gear to help you customize it somewhat to make it work.

Edited by King Davy, 28 August 2012 - 08:38 AM.


#7 reelinsteel

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 08:43 AM

I agree 100% with King Davy. In my opinion a switch rod is plenty of rod for most LO tribs ( if you plan on fishing Oswego, Genesee and Niagara a lot then you will want a Spey rod), and offers great versatility- makes a great nymphing rod, and even cast well as a single -hander. If you can do a single spey with a one-hander, you can do it with a switch rod.
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#8 JimboBoeheim

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 08:48 AM

If you are set on picking up a switch I like the Echo's or Mystic but for a less costly introduction pick up a TFO Deer Creek. It's a good rod and they are a good company. Their customer service is top notch and you can't beat the lifetime guarantee.
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#9 King Davy

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 08:56 AM

Second the TFO Deer Creek...good frined and I worked through a 1/2 doz. switch Rods at Spey Nation as he was trying to figure out what he liked. I had an array of heads we ran on them...and the TFO was wonderful...and is the best priced out of all of them. The Deer Creek's have a wide grain window so you can utilize many different heads on it that allows you the versatility in the fishing options you will use during a days outing. Also Jim is spot on the three rivers I fish with a full fledged Spey rod are the Niagara, Genny, and Oswego...in NYS.

#10 BobberDown

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 09:07 AM

I have a wild water 7/8 switch. it was about $170. I am still working on setting it up with the appropriate line. I like the rod for price, and I like having a lifetime warrenty. It has only caught 3 steelies and a brown so far, so Im interested to see what a chinook does to it. I was having troubles with line weights, and at spey nation Tim Rajeff from Echo gave me a hand. He came down to the water with me to cast it a few times. He said he really liked it and thought it was a good stick for the money. He said it is definitely is more on the 8wt side and recommended a 510 grain head (when the manufacture recommended 350). Good luck with you search.
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#11 HOOKED

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 09:32 AM

It will be hard to beat the TFO DC.The price point is great .The Warr cant be beat.It is a great looking rod but for the cork being less than great.I have a couple DCs that are a go-to rod.The 7W switch has pulled in anything I have hooked,Though at times of big flow an 8 W would be more suited.Any thing under 1000 its the 7W when I'm looking for a switch.I also have the DC baby spey that is just a blast for summer trout or bass on the SR.Ive seen the switches used for under or about 200 bean.

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#12 TroutBum76

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 09:50 AM

Thanks all, I will definitely continue my research on this. I am trying to feed the need without breaking the bank haha. I have my single hand 9wt that I bring every year for the salmon run but spey just interests me as a way to further casts and presentation and not wear out your shoulder after a day on the water. So that is why I thought a switch would cover both worlds so to speak. Or maybe I should go full spey and only break it out when needed? I always go to Melinda's when I make a trip up. At least two or three times every trip because there is always something I forgot or was fighting my buyers remorse on the day before haha but I will have to talk to her about this when I get up there.

The TFO looks like a decent rod and for the money so does the wild water for a starter. I was wondering what might be a good line wt? 7/8 for steel and browns? Would it handle a king or a striper in the hudson by me in the spring?

Thanks again.

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"Fishing is not an escape from life, but often a deeper immersion into it..." Harry Middleton

 

"A river, though, has so many things to say that it is hard to know what it says to each of us." Norman Maclean, A River Runs Through It


#13 Fish-N-Chip

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 01:44 PM

A 7wt rod is just fine for steelies and browns.

When it comes to lines focus on the "grain weight" because every spey and switch rod has a "grain window" that will make the rod "sing." There are short belly lines, mid belly lines, long belly lines, scandinavian lines, skagit lines so it can be a little confusing at first. The main difference between all of these lines is the belly length. For example, a short belly line may weigh 350 grains with a 25ft belly where as a long belly line could have the same grain weight but the weight will be spread over a longer belly that may be 75ft or more. Typically the longer the belly the more difficult to cast.

The majority of people using spey and switch on the SR are either using short belly, scandi, or skagit lines.

#14 SteelieStudent

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 04:09 PM

If you want to get started without spending a lot of dough, use your 9 weight single hand rod, and whatever reel you have for it. Get a heavier line for it (10 weight WF or 11 weight DT) and buy a couple of extra fast sink polyleaders, one 5' and one 10'. If the line doesn't fit on your reel, just cut off the back third to half of the line. You don't need that part for casting. If your 9 wt rod has a short fighting butt, it will help if you hold that with thumb and forefinger while doing the spey casts.

With this setup you can perform the basic spey casts and swing streamers. You won't be able to cast/fish the very heavy flies like Intruders.. but you really don't need to. Lightly weighted streamers like zonkers or wooly buggers will work. Positioning, angle of the cast, and mending will give you depth control of the fly.

Once you learn the spey casts, you'll find yourself using them in your other fly fishing also. I rarely overhead cast anymore unless I'm casting dry flies to trout. The Belgian underhand cast is another very useful cast to learn, also.
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#15 jeremy_warner

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 06:26 AM

Buy an anglers roost set up, switch rod, reel, line under 5
210 and they are quality. Steve godshall helped design ares lines and swears they are the best rods in the 500.00 and lower.range, I have their blank on a custom 14' 8wt thats marked 5/6 but is meant for the 530gr range and its a rockey
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#16 herodrift

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 07:28 AM

get yourself an 11' 6wt and line it up with WF8. you can do just about anything with that. You can bottom bounce, use an indicator, or add a sink tip or poly leader if you want to swing. Hell you can even snag with it too if thats your thing. Very versatile.
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